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Dear friends, I am an ordinary person like you trying to save money using coupons and promotions on our every day items. When I find a new coupon code, I share it on my blog so that everyone can get the same discounts what I got. If you feel the coupon was useful please leave me a feedback, if the coupon doesn't work please let me know. Regards Bob

Valuable Top Aged Premium Domain Live Auctions Click any Link down

Tobyclements Newsletter Valued Domain Names

  • 2793 Pine St

    2793 Pine St

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  • 1100 Broderick St

    1100 Broderick St

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  • 868 Turk St

    868 Turk St

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  • 420 Fell St

    420 Fell St

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Thursday, December 13, 2012

Where to get godaddy .co .net .org .me .fm .com .ws .mobi .ca .us coupon code or discount code

If you are looking for godaddy .co .net .org .me .fm .com .ws .mobi .ca .us coupon code or discount code or gidaddy promo code or godaddy promocode you reached the right place

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This coupon will give instant 20% off on any extension godaddy domain name .It worked for me on sale domains also.

Godaddy Coupon code Expires august 30 2013

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Friday, December 7, 2012

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Use code wow20coupo 20 % off any domain includes 20% off .com, .net,.co,.org,.info,.net,.es,.fm,.ca,.me,.biz,.mobi,.be,.ms,.in,.co.in,.org

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Thursday, December 6, 2012

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Friday, November 23, 2012

Llll .com Domain investment Strategies and future values of 4 letter.com

Four letter domain names are very hard to find these days . As you might know literally all combinations of four letter .com generally referred as LLLL.com domains are registered. You can search any combination of 4 letter domains its taken.

Reasons
1. Four letter LLLL.com are Brandable and easy to sell
2. It is easy to remember
3. LLLL .com domains are ranked higher by search engines

Some websites like circy.info ,1domainaday.com, 1domainaday ebay store sell these 4 letter domains, there are many sellers and buyers on Sedo too. Personally I buy from ebay because its cheaper and not many domain investors are searching in ebay. So you get good 4 letter lLLL.com domains for less in Auction.

Try to buy pronounceable domains
LLL.com:
Min Wholesale: $4800
Double Premiums: $6200
Triple Premium: $12000
LLLL.com:
Minimum Wholesale: $22
CCCC: $21 ($500)
CCVC: $26 ($600)
CVCC: $27 ($600)
CCVV: $44 ($600)
VCCC: $30 ($750)
VVCC: $32 ($1000)
VCCV: $34 ($1500)
CVVC: $45 ($1800)
VVVC: $75 ($1000)
VCVC: $75 ($4000)
CVVV: $85 ($900)
VVCV: $90 ($1500)
VCVV: $100 ($2000)
VVVV: $250* ($1500)
CVCV: $300 ($9000)

* Insufficient sales data to conclusively provide a minimum valuation.
The letter Y was considered a consonant for the purpose of this price guide. In reality, it can serve as both a consonant or vowel, however this often becomes somewhat subjective and open to bias (eg. sellers will always think their domain is more pronounceable than buyers).
single premium: $25
double premium: $29
triple premium: $35
quad premium: $240
triple letter: $200 ($800)
triple repeat: $350 ($1800)
palindrome: $300 ($1200)
ABAB: $275 ($1000)
AABB: $400 ($1500)


Thursday, November 22, 2012

Watch ICANN’s new TLD lottery online

The biggest sweepstakes in the history of ICANN is coming . Do not miss this.

ICANN is going to hold its new TLD lottery “prioritization draw” on December 17 in Los Angeles.

The results are used to determine the order in which the initial evaluation results are released. This will have for sure some correlation to when you can actually get your TLD live on the web, so it’s a big deal.

ICANN is doing four things for the draw to make things smart:

1. It’s at the Hilton LAX. You can literally fly into LAX and make it to the hotel in 15 minutes.

2. You don’t have to be present for the draw to participate. You can buy your tickets as early as December 12 and then go home — you’re entered into the draw when you buy your tickets.

3. The draw will be broadcast live online.

4. You can send a proxy to buy your ticket. If you don’t have one, ICANN will help you find a no-charge proxy.

Monday, November 5, 2012

Why Should You Invest In IDNs?

Jan 17, 2011 11 Comments by


A few good friends started a casual email discussion as to why IDNs are valuable. Spurred on by their thoughtful responses, here are my thoughts on the matter:

Pent-Up Demand Leading to Future Value:
In many countries IDNs will displace Latin domains as the domains of choice since native language domains are preferred. As an example, see .РФ names where in two months since release, over 700,000 Russian IDNs were registered. As another example, see China where long strings of numeric domains were used as a makeshift solution for the lack of Chinese domains. Imagine if you, as an English speaker, had to register domains in Chinese for all these years and then awareness just began to build that English domains are becoming available on both sides of the dot — this is the excitement that many non-English speakers feel towards IDNs. Natives have native language keyboards, mainly read native language newspapers, magazines, and internet content, write native language emails, letters and watch native language movies and T.V. As awareness continues to build that IDNs exist and native language domains are available their adoption will continue to spike.

Cost Effectiveness:
For $500, a startup Israeli company for instance can get a Hebrew domain that is infinitely more memorable than a Latin domain that can be purchased for $500.

Brandable Value:
Many customers could more effectively remember and relate to a brand in one’s native language. Some Asian companies have even branded as “(Japanese name).com” first before realizing that it is possible for them to register the corresponding IDN.

SEO Value / Search Volume:
There is a great deal of search volume for non-Latin terms. Buying an affordable IDN with over 500,000 exact GAKT searches a month is very doable. As the ElliotsBlog/IDNTools contest demonstrated, buying high-search volume handregs is also very possible.

SEO Value / SERP Ranking:
Owning an IDN is a huge competitive advantage SEO-wise, leading to mom-and-pop IDN stores being on the first page of Google for major terms.

Six-Figure IDN Resales:
It wasn’t long ago that IDN buyers were being laughed at for “wasting” low $x,xxx on IDNs. Those investments have paid dividends for domain resellers as just this past year there was a handful of 5-figure and 6-figure IDN sales. Examples include: 日本.com for $100,000 (“Japan” in Japanese) and рф.com for $60,000 (“RF” in Russian) (see IDN Tools Sales Chart for more). This is pretty impressive given that IDN awareness is still in its infancy.

IDN Passive Income:
Many custom made IDN parking platforms now exist like NameDrive and Wixi.jp. Many affiliate programs also exist for IDNs such as Amazon.co.jp, and Linkshare.jp among hundreds of others. It has never been easier to monetize your IDNs.

How to Start
It is not easy learning how to register top IDNs, but the thousands of members at IDNForums will be more than happy to show you. If verifying translations is tough for you, we put together the IDN Newsletter which sells domains with certified native translations. And if you are a bargain hunter, check out our IDN Droplist. Feel free to shoot me a question or comment at any time — whether you use one of our services or not — and I’d be glad to try and help.

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

07/31/2012 GoDaddy: 1-Year Domain Name Registration for $0.99 + Extra 30% Off Entire Order

   
07/31/2012

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Friday, July 27, 2012

Domain Investment Strategies and things to consider

If you’re are a domain investor and considering purchasing domain names for investment in the form of new registrations, or in the secondary resale market), it’s important to focus on how you’re actually going to make money from your portfolio of domains.
Without a clear, up-front vision of the “path to liquidity” for your domain investments, it’s better to stay out of the investment side of the business entirely. Remember, a domain name that is gathering virtual dust (i.e. that’s not generating traffic or sales inquiries) is worth nothing at all. In fact, it has a negative value since you’ll be required to pay a renewal fee every year to maintain the registration.
On the other hand, if you can find ways to generate revenue from a domain name even while you’re waiting to unlock much greater value from it through sales or leasing transactions, you’re in a much stronger position. As long as a domain name pays for its own upkeep over the course of a year, there’s nothing, in theory, to stop you from holding on to it indefinitely.
Before getting into the monetization of domain names, let’s look at some of the other risks inherent in domain name investments and how it adds up to the type of risks people take when investing in stocks.

Thursday, July 19, 2012

How to Buy Domain Names Like a Pro: 10 Tips from the Founder of PhoneTag.com


A rose is a rose is rose… but not with domain names. (Photo: nickwheeleroz)

I have founded more than a half dozen companies, exited from one and currently spend my time on PhoneTag and Grid.com. I have spent over $250,000 on approximately 200 domain names because I believe that a great domain is extremely important to the success of a start-up (I learned the hard way – PhoneTag used to be called SimulScribe).
It’s especially important if you are starting a virtual business as it’s both your company name and how people will find you. My overall rules for domains are: they must be easy to spell, easy to say, and .com (no .net, .us, etc.) domains.
What I find tricky about purchasing domains is that you cannot use comparable sales (like real estate) or actual intrinsic value estimates (as you can with a car, jewelry, TV, etc.) for your negotiations. Vibrator.com sold for $1 million, I spent over $100,000 on Grid.com, yet sometimes you can find names that will be valuable for $10.
I have used my success and failure in buying domains to create a step-by-step process that should help secure the domain you want…

1. Brainstorm names

Type a list. Keep in mind that the better the name the more likely it is to be taken or expensive (see step 6, valuation). [From Tim: a useful tool for looking at word combinations is Dot-o-mator.com.]

2. Initial sort

Go to Godaddy.com, upload your list using the “bulk upload” feature. If there are any domains that are not taken you will see them now. If you like any of the ones that are available, you just got lucky.

3. Hit the auctions

Domaintools has a good search that aggregates most of the auctions. Sedo is also a good place to search keywords. You can sometimes find a great name for a few hundred dollars here.

4. Shrink your list

Go to each domain, i.e. for “XYZ”, go to xyz.com. Break your list into four categories:
a. Real Business – Any names that are being used for a business should go to the bottom of your list. It is nearly impossible to get these. When we bought Trustme.com there was a business there, but it made things a lot harder and pricier.
b. Squatter/Investor Pages – Used to monetize the location. They are typically easy to figure out as they are just links to other sites for lead generation. These sites are almost always for sale, so this is a good page to see. PhoneTag.com had one of these when I found it.
picture-phonetag
The original page for Phonetag.com
c. Construction Pages – This usually means either of two things. Someone is about to put up a business at this site or an amateur registered the page and forgot about it or is holding it. I have had decent success in names that have these pages up.
d. Dead Pages – Nothing comes up, does not mean it is available. It’s hard to draw any conclusions from these names, other than that the owner is not making money off of it. Nobel.com was a dead page. I found the owner, a large insurance company, convinced them that they should give us the name (we had Nobelcom.com) and, surprisingly, they did. In contacting the company, I figured a CEO or high-level person will hold me over the barrel for money and a low level person will not have the authority, so I went to a VP level in the IT area. My company was NobelCom.com, and I pleaded on a human level that they would be helping a young entrepreneurial company. It worked. For the VP to do the paperwork to sell the domain was harder than just giving it to us. Part luck, part skill. That domain is probably worth north of $50,000.

5. Contact the owners

First you need to confirm that you can not only locate but also communicate with the owner. For Grid.com it took me over a month to find the owners.
a. See if the contact details are listed on the site. Many sites have a contact US or “this domain may be for sale” link. I have found that my success rate is higher when these messages exist on the site. Also use the internet archive to look at old pages and contact details.
b. If you cannot find it on the site then use the “who is” directory (I like domaintools.com for this).
i. About 30-40% of the time the real domain owner’s info comes up.
ii. The rest of the time it is either dead info or private. For the private stuff if you send an email to the private address it should in theory get to the owner. In practice I have found this rarely works.
iii. If standard “who is” does not work, try using the historical “who is” (domaintools.com offers this)

6. Contact the owner and ask if the domain is for sale. DON’T MAKE AN OFFER.

a. Contact directly – If you are a student, first-time entrepreneur, or someone whom I would find no Google results for, then contact the people directly. If you have documented success, then don’t contact people directly, as the price will be based on your status. With Grid.com I had such a hard time finding the owner that during my investigation I accidentally emailed the owner with my real details. This mistake probably raised my price by well over $50,000.
b. Hiding your info -
i. Cheap way – register a gmail/yahoo address with something like joe1234@gmail.com. Sign the email Joe (no last name) and don’t give any personal info out. You might look like a scammer so it lowers your chance of contact.
ii. Pricey way -
Option 1: Use a service. There are a few services that allow you to mask who you are to contact the owners, godaddy.com, networksolutions.com, etc, offer this. I have tried these services and have had zero success.
Option 2: Use a small law firm or PR firm which has a website. Make sure that if you looked them up, you would think they are just above the poverty line on the business food chain. This is the best way that I have found. This service should cost between $100 and $300. To find these firms, I usually ask friends for referrals or just go to someone local (every town has a small law firm). It allows the seller to see that they are being contacted by someone real and it does not jack up the price. This is how I got PhoneTag.com, Trustme.com, as well as a few others.

7. Valuation

As I mentioned, the biggest problem with valuation is that there are almost no comparables to go by. Many times you are dealing with an individual owner, so the domain is worth what they will sell it for. I typically do not have a budget in mind because I look at domains as an asset like real estate.

8. This is my rationalization when figuring out what to spend:

a. How many letters is the name
i. 3-4 letter words are expensive. They can sell for anywhere between 5k-500k
ii. 5 letters and above start to get cheaper
b. How many words is the name?
i. 1 word is most valuable, each additional word is less valuable
c. How easy is it to spell?
d. Is there a reason why people would type this word(s) in their browser? (You can get a traffic analysis on the domain from Compete.com if you want to get the actual numbers) For example: College.com is worth a lot because people type it in, and it gets natural search traffic. PhoneTag.com is worth less because there is no traffic.
e. Do the words naturally go together like “Phone tag”, or are they random like “Micro soft”? The less natural they are, the lower the value of the name.
f. If the domain has a “my”, “the” or other like word in front of it then it is going to be worth a lot less.
g. How will this domain affect my business?
i. A better domain is more viral, which reduces customer acquisition cost
ii. What is each customer worth to you?
iii. What is your current customer acquisition cost?

9. Negotiation

Here are the typical negotiation responses after you get in contact with the owner:
a. “I will sell it to you for $800,000” When you get ridiculous offers, I typically go back with what I think they are worth, so for Bulk.com they asked for 800k and I went back at 35k. The owner declined the offer. I could not justify a higher price for that name so I moved on.
b. “I don’t know, what do you think”. This person wants to sell. They are going to negotiate you up for sure. Typically I would go in at 20-30% below my bottom range of my budget. A note of caution here: If you write back that you will buy it for $5,000, just realize that it is a contract that could be enforceable in court. This actually happened to me with a domain called KisKis.com. Always put some language like, “I will buy it for $5,000 pending all terms are agreeable.”
c. “$500” (when you think it is worth $5,000) Ok, great you have a price. Be careful though, if you just say “yes”, you might spook the seller, as they will think they underpriced their domain. This happened to me with Grid.com. In the end, I had to sue the owner to enforce the contract (settled out of court before trial). If the domain in question is just decent and you don’t care if you lose it, then either say “yes” or negotiate down a bit. [Tim: I prefer the latter to avoid seller's remorse and rescinding of offers.]
d. “$5,000” (when you think it is worth $5,000) Use the info from point C above, but you do not have to be as cautious because you are close to market.

10. Get them to agree

As I said above, if they say yes to your price, that is a contract and is very enforceable. Try and get a yes in writing as quickly as you can. Once you have that, immediately open up an escrow account. I use Escrow.com. The faster you fund the account the better chance you have of the seller not being able to back out.
###

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

DNSR Announces that Super Premium Domain iSay.com is Going Up for Sale for the First Time Ever

DNSR.com (Domain Name Sales Report) is pleased to announce that the generic domain iSay.com first registered in 1996 is going up for sale for the first time ever. iSay.com represents a very unique opportunity for any company or individual who is interested in owning a highly brandable domain name.
Delray Beach, Florida (PRWEB) July 17, 2012
iSay.com, a domain that was first registered in 1996, is going up for sale for the first time ever. The generic, yet highly brandable domain has received more than 500 unsolicited offers over the last sixteen years. Since it was being used for a project until recently, those offers were ultimately ignored.
Now the owner of the domain is looking to move on with other opportunities and has decided to offer it for sale. However in this case unlike most domain name sales, it will not be sold off to the company or individual who is willing to sign the biggest check.
The owner of the domain has a great amount of personal attachment to it, so where it ultimately ends up is of great importance and will in fact play a very big role in determining who it is sold off to.
According to the founder of DNSR.com, also known as Domain Name Sales Report Sean Sullivan, “iSay.com is a really incredible domain and one that I think would be extremely beneficial to a number of corporations. As we have seen in the past from the efforts of others, these types of domain names are essentially lightning rods for attention and often become the cornerstone for an emerging brands marketing campaign. It is rare that these domains ever come up for sale and most often they are quickly and quietly acquired in private deals. We anticipate receiving even more interest from potential buyers in the coming weeks.”
The popularity of these types of domain names is well known and in many cases they end up being the center piece for a large corporation’s key products and services. Often the most valuable of the domain names are sold for six and seven figures. Most notably with iReport.com being sold to Time Warner for $750,000 in 2008, iGuide.com for $100,000 in 2009 and it has been speculated that others have sold for millions in private deals that were locked under non-disclosure agreements.
While the sale is expected to bring a considerable amount of money, ultimately that is not the deciding factor.
Sullivan explaining further, “As ridiculous as it might sound to some people, the owner of the name has a real emotional attachment to it. For those of us working within technology our whole lives, domains can become the (almost) physical embodiment of a dream. So when you have to let go of that, and move on from it, it can be tough. The owner is interested in working with DNSR for the purpose of not only publicizing the sale, but making sure that the domain finds a home where it will be put to good use. We think that over the next few weeks we will be able to accomplish that goal.”
Interested parties should go to the information page regarding iSay.com which can be found at this link. iSay.com Domain Name.
About DNSR:
DNSR is not a domain brokerage company, but instead acts as a third party that can often help companies and intellectual property owners find the middle ground to increase the probability of a sale. Most often using quantifiable research data and analysis to determine the most accurate price range for a domain name and or website.
DNSR will connect the buyer and seller and in some cases work with domain brokers on both the buyer and sellers side and then assist in the logistics of completing the transaction.
DNSR also provides it’s clients with legal support and has full time in house counsel to defend domains from UDRP. It has successfully defended clients from several Fortune 500 companies against UDRP, Domain Name Hijacking and TM applications for the purpose of UDRP.
DNSR is based out of Delray Beach, Florida

Selling only Premium Domains

I figured that would get your attention. The weekly inspirational sales report from Sedo has arrived. This week’s list contains some names that are great buys and some that prove yet again, that domains are all unique and what they sell for should never surprise you. Buy it now reached 44%, making domains look like Auto Nation where people no longer want to haggle for prices. Just tell me what it costs. Here is this week’s list.

Domain namePriceCurrency
.COMs
ssm.com25,000USD
wardrobes.com20,600USD
officedeskchairs.com19,000USD
pict.com14,995USD

Monday, March 26, 2012

Premium LLLL.com Value Rises 101% In Less Three Weeks

Thanks to Dominik for pointing me to the new LLLL price guide published by Reece Berg. Reece is an LLLL investor with a portfolio of over 1800 domains, he is also a moderator at the NamePros community. His last price guide was published on December 18th.

Pricing Your Domains for Sale With Confidence
What do your prices say about your domain names for sale?Read below for some suggestions and tips for pricing your domains for sale.
Selling an $8 domain name!You’re saying, “I have a domain name that is not valuable and I don’t really want it.” This is an attempt to get your registration fee (domain investment) back. Destined to expire.Selling a $25 domain name!You’re saying, “This domain has moderate value to me but I would like to get it off my hands and double my money. Good luck reselling this name for more.” A good price for flipping a hand registration at a surprisingly big profit percentage.Selling a $50 domain name!You’re saying, “I may have planned on using this domain name for my own project. This domain has good potential for an end user or earns a little revenue of some kind.” If this domain provides a benefit to the buyer in any way, they will probably be willing to pay.Selling a $100 domain name!Be careful with this one. What you should be saying, “My domain has premium letters and a clearly defined purpose.” What you could be saying, “I don’t really want to sell this domain right now so I’m just pricing it high or it could be that I really don’t know how much this domain is worth.” Probably less.Selling a $1000 domain name!You’re saying, “Premium domain for sale!” If you have done your research and have a premium domain. Take note, premium domains come in many different forms; LLL’s, sweet LLLL’s (4 letter domains), generic terms, prime keywords, profitable industries and brand names to name a few. Try to market your premium domains to end users or place them in publicized auctions to get the most out of your investment.Take these recommendations with a grain of salt, they are merely my reflections from my experience in domain sales. I can say that I own premium domain names, but I have not sold one yet. I personally like to sell the majority of my domain names for $35, please view prices at my portfolio of domains for sale. I would love to hear your comments/critiques regarding my pricing tips.

LLLL Values Are UpDomains with four premium letters increased in value by 101% with an average sale price of $303 up from $151 on Dec. 18th. Here are some examples of these types of names: CGLP.com, VYYY.com, GCBL.com, PDOP.com, UJIL.com, EDIJ.com, LSAL.com, HMCT, PPRD.com.The minimum wholesale price for LLLL domains averaged $14. Regardless of quality of letters, registering any LLLL.com domain that expires can net you at least 200% profit! According to the report, if you’re looking to invest some money into four letter domains, the best deals can be found at NamePros, eBay, and TDNAM.Summary of LLLL.com SalesSales under $150.00 represented 15.7% of LLLL.com spending, bringing in $39,965 out of $255,053 reportedly spent on LLLL.coms in December. …there were 228 sales over $150, largely dominated by quad premiums, CVCV’s and VCVC’s. These 228 sales brought in $224,288.50 for an average of $983.72 (each). Median price in the $150+ category was $309.50.Total of $255,053 spent on LLLL.com domains in December.Interesting ExclusionsThese notable LLLL domain sales were excluded from the report so they would not skew data.XIAN.com fetched $40,000. It is the name of a city in China.VSIA.com, a typo of VISA sold for $10,000.

Sunday, March 25, 2012

Domain investment guide : Keywords with Highest Cost Per Click

For all domain investors,Here you go, this list is current:

Always remember buy and develop websites with high CPC so that you will get paid more for each click.
Rank Term CPC
1 donate car to charity california $130.25
2 donate car for tax credit $126.65
3 donate cars in ma $125.58
4 donate your car sacramento $118.20
5 how to donate a car in california $111.21
6 donate your car for kids $106.01
7 car insurance quotes colorado $100.93
8 nunavut culture $99.52
9 dayton freight lines $99.39
10 harddrive data recovery services $98.59
11 donate a car in maryland $98.51
12 motor replacements $98.43
13 cheap domain registration hosting $98.39
14 donating a car in maryland $98.20
15 donate cars illinois $98.13
16 criminal defense attorneys florida $98.07
17 best criminal lawyer in arizona $97.93
18 car insurance quotes utah $97.92
19 life insurance co lincoln $97.07
20 holland michigan college $95.74
21 online motor insurance quotes $95.73
22 online colledges $95.65
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Saturday, March 24, 2012

Domain name investment business what you can expect as a return for your investment

I don't have all the answers and I don't have to. Just a few will do. Like you, I can only guess. Speculate. Put my money on it and see how it all unfolds.

When I was a kid I remember when the Empire State Building was sold for $12 Million and everyone was stunned how anyone can overpay so much. Sex.com sold for more than the Empire State Building. Fast forward and now we are talking many billions. They are even taking the building public to raise a Billion Dollars.

Las Vegas years ago had nothing but sand and a vision. A longshot vision.

I can tell this story 100 ways from 100 views and another 100 paths on each. Here is only ONE of many ways I see what I do and domains in general.

I would describe what my business plan like this as a real world type parallel..

1. My first hurdle was to figure out how to afford to hold and maintain many domain names for 20 years.

2. Buy raw dotcom land in many places throughout the USA with potential for commercial development.

3. Focus on Oceanfront, Riverfront, close to ocean or river.

4. Try and target Times Square for advertising and Las Vegas for sheer people power.

5. Study the development of places like Times Square and Las Vegas.

6. Since I was too late, too young and too broke to participate in that game, I found one that has parallels in a new dimension.

7. So imagine it is 1948 and you are in Las Vegas. There is just SAND! There is nothing else.

8. Build it and they will come and so they do.

9. I see this new thing happening and realize that there may be many ways to capitalize on something like this if it were to work even if gambling is not your business.

10. So the first road is paved and now there is a street.

11. Let’s call this street (Las Vegas Blvd) Dotcom Blvd

12. I have a few extra dollars and decide to buy some land on Dotcom Blvd.

13. I decided it will be many years before it will have any value because right now it is just sand and wind.

14. I think if this idea were to unfold the way they say, millions of people will come to Dotcom Blvd in Las Vegas.

15. But SHIT!!! That will take TWENTY YEARS!!

16. I decide it is now or never. If I don’t buy it somebody else may come and buy it. Act NOW or it’s over!

17. I go have lunch and decide to buy the piece of land I was looking at.

18. SHIT!!! Somebody else bought it within the hour.

19. I better go look for another dotcom property.

20. SHIT!!! That one is already sold! (Maybe I can grab his sand and move it?)

21. The third is a charm. I now have my own dotcom sand.

22. Gee these guys are buying multiple properties. What do they see?

23. Gee, these guys are pretty sharp.

24. I think I am going to buy some more dotcom sand

25. I tell others in business, they just laugh at me for buying sand.

26. I try and explain that in 20 years or less this sand will be very valuable because a lot of people will be passing by everyday.

27. They laugh

28. I buy more sand

29. More people laugh

30. I keep talking about this 20 year plan.

31. They laugh

32. I explain about it being a “Unique opportunity in time”

33. They laugh

34. I explain you MUST get the land first if you are to even have a chance at success.

35. They laugh

36. I explain this was an opportunity that my father and grandfather and their fathers before them never had and they should pay attention.

37. They laughed.

38. I bought a major corner on Dotcom Blvd in Las Vegas

39. They stopped laughing but now thought I was insane.

40. I repeated the process 1000 times

41. Others started repeating the process

42. Sand turned into activity.

43. I stood on my sand. I looked at the hotels being built

44. I put up a few billboards on my sand with no advertising

45. The new casinos in town see the billboards

46. One hotel asks to put his name on my billboard

47. I say ok

48. He gives me $1 Million check

49. People passing buy laughing at me for not building.

50. I put some more billboards up

51. More people give me more money

52. I learn about effective billboards

53. I learn about ineffective billboards

54. I learn where folks are going

55. I learn what folks are looking for

56. I open up a short cut to the hotel via a sidewalk on my sand.

57. It saves the folks time and money

58. Casino is willing to pay me more to be exclusive and have all my sidewalks lead to his casino

59. Next thing ya know they need parking spaces

60. They pay me more for my sand then I can earn selling water in the desert.

61. I abandon idea of opening up lemonade stands and decide to open parking lots instead.

62. Parking lots have low overhead and are cash cows

63. That’s what gets me to New York. San Francisco. It’s been YEARS since I was in San Francisco, at that time the rate was $70/day. Most people on earth don’t even make $70 a day. Go tell those parking lots they don’t have a legitimate business and own the priciest of real estate.

64. Gee, that sounds like a good way to do it while I pass the 20 years.

65. Gee look at etoys

66. Gee look at Pets.com

67. Gee, I think it is smarter to wait and learn from their mistakes than pissing away billions of investor dollars on a bag of smoke.

68. Gee impression based advertising is stupid.

69. Gee impression based advertising was like a parking lot stealing all the cars

70. Gee how come that model collapsed and took many down with it?

71. Impression based advertising was like driving a bus down dotcom blvd and simply pointing out the casino. The casino paid to get pointed out but could not have a benefit because the bus and customers were long gone along with the money the casino or all other businesses paid. The bus never stopped to be=ring them the damn customer!

72. Gee that was dumb.

73. Gee, I talked about it constantly in 1998 and 1999.

74. Gee that was what collapsed things in 2000. It had to collapse using that model and it did. It was a flawed and worthless model but they all bought into it.

75. Many walk away

76. I just shrug it off as a learning experience for the totally ignorant and a rip off of epic proportions from those providing those worthless impressions that were not aimed at making sales.

77. Why do I just laugh and shrug it off?

78. I have a 20 year plan.

79. Many laugh

80. Many can’t plan 20 seconds ahead let alone 20 minutes, 20 hours, 20 days, 20 weeks, 20 months, 20 years.

81. Why get educated if you can’t think 20 years in advance.

82. When you look at things like that, everything is merely a blip and the important things are easy to pick out.

83. Those that work real hard and went broke get pissed

84. Those that did not see what was coming get pissed

85. Those that laughed are now pissed and they know the difference between our 2 plans.

86. I will start my projects as sand turns into concrete

87. I don’t even have to open a casino in Las Vegas to make money.

88. Where there are people there are always ways to make money

89. When you understand traffic on Dotcom Blvd. that gives you power and insight that very few have.

90. When you watch and understand that traffic for 20 years you learn things others have never even thought of or questioned.

91. That leads me to buy more sand in more places.

92. See I think developing for the sake of developing is not something I ever wanted to pursue even though I tried numerous times throughout the years.

93. I plan develop by NEED and audience size matched with a profitable good or service.

94. But the dust on the Internet has yet to settle although it is now taking on direction and shape.

95. Something that I envisioned would take 20 years because of the enormous size of the change of habit and it would be worldwide in a way that nobody can really understand. Never in the history of mankind have so many adapted to something new so quick. Yes 20 years is a FLASH. Nothing ever became so universal so fast. Not electric, not phones, not TV, not even the computer itself.

96. How long do you think it would take for the Internet to evolve back in 1996 when less than 1% of the world’s population was online?

97. So the way I see things is very different than perhaps anyone else as I am sure your visions may be unique to you and what you want and the lifestyle you are striving for.

98. While I saw domains being something that would bring many people together, I don’t ever think I saw that just selling the picks and shovels could be such a multi billion dollar business and still expanding.

99. While I thought domains would parallel real estate, it did so faster, deeper and more mainstream than I thought would happen.

100. I think social media only enhances this in an exponential way.

101. So I still believe we are in our adolescence. But it won’t be much longer that adolescence begins the journey of maturity.

102. So just like a boy or a girl takes 20 years to mature and THEN blossom, so was my approach to Dotcom Blvd.

103. Graduation day is not the day you reach your full potential. It’s the day you start your journey.

104. It’s the day you mark when things really begin

105. It’s the day that starts life as we know it.

106. So I have this 20 year plan and folks still laugh.

107. But I have the “Luxury of time” to decide which parking lots are turned into Skyscrapers or Department Stores or just keeping as a parking lot until there are no more cars to service.

108. Real Estate, Oil wells, Mineral Rights, Parking Lots, Store Fronts, Billboards, Message Boards, Gold Mines, Diamonds, name your poison. Name your path. Name your trail. Never has any single item had so many faces and possibilities and parallels as a domain name.

109. So we can be condemned for seeing things early but that won’t change the facts of acting on a hunch and taking a huge risk when the next guy with the same opportunity passed on that great risk

110. Great risk receives great rewards when the risk you take just happens to unfold as you saw years ago.

111. So what would you call somebody that bought in the desert when nobody else on the entire planet wanted it and everyone laughed at him? What do you call the guy today with an acre of sand on Las Vegas Blvd that is just a parking lot? Some old fat guy at the gate with a cigar hanging from his mouth. Each night he collects $20 each for the 5000 cars that fit in his garage. Oh didn’t I tell you, he decided to focus and build on that parking lot a 12 story garage capable of holding 5000 cars at $20 each and turns the spaces an average of 2.5 times a day. Gets $50 on special event days.

112. The fat guy at the gate just keeps laughing as each car hands him $20. Another puff on the cigar, another laugh. $250,000/day business and he did damn well for his $100 investment. The garage he built that was a simple skeleton paid itself off in just 4 weeks so there is no mortgage.

113. They told the old guy he no longer had to collect the cash. That now they had machines to do the same thing and he could go to Florida and just lay on the beach.

114. I heard he declined the move. He just loved laughing his ass off. Every 5th car would pay off that original $100 mortgage.

115. Ok, so that is one path. One parallel. Now let’s talk about the oil well parallels.

116. Then the Gold Rush Parallel.

And to be fair, don’t forget the tulips. The greatest BUST in history and to some, domaining is exactly like that. Don’t know about the tulips? Look it up!
There is also the collectible parallel.
The TV parallel
The Hollywood Parallel
The stock market Parallel
The Location, Location, Location, parallel
The Monopoly Game Parallel.
The Game of Life Parallel
The Radio, Newpaper, Magazine Parallel
More parallels in one commodity than all others combined and I have barely scratched the surface!
There has never been anything quite as universal and VALUABLE as a meaningful domain name and 2012 marks the year that the cat is out of the bag. Predators from every corner will come out like cockroaches at night trying to undermine your efforts in any way possible. Some of my friends are way too nice and find themselves on the short end. My only suggestion is to grow some balls and learn how to tell people to shove it up their ass with a 2 x 4.

See there are efforts by scammers that don’t take 20 years. They can fake out the system in 2 or 3 years or less and then just walk away with your property. Folks it is time to stop being naive. The next jackass that contacts you that you never heard of that wants one of your domains is likely not who they say they are and likely have an agenda. Why pay for a domain when they can PLAY the domainer?

Good luck and go grab your share of the pie! But don’t be a victim of those predators. They play with an empty hand, don’t play with an empty offense. You don't need a lawyer all the time, but you do need balls every moment from this day forward.

As investors in domain names we have done nothing wrong and worked within the system to capitalize on something just as they have done for hundreds of years on millions of items. Buy a $10 piece of art at a garage sale and a Picasso is behind it, well it’s yours and nothing will change it unless it had been stolen to begin with.

That brings me to my last point. Even if you lose a domain, track it!!! If you lose a domain because of wrong doing and it is years later, learn from the sex.com case. I believe in the years ahead we will see domain returned to their original owner and whatever business has been built will collapse overnight.

If you pay your annual fees, and don't do infringe or do anything intentionally wrong with your domain, then don't be intimidated by companies large or small. The smallest guy can defeat the biggest guy with WORDS and THOUGHTS and IDEAS as well as public opinion.

Your only limit is your "Life Expectancy". So something maturing in 100 years won't do you a whole lot of good in life. You'll be long dead. Depending on your age, you may have 20-40 year horizon to accomplish what you want. Life is not as long as you may think.

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Domain Names With Geo Specific Keywords Offer Local Ranking Opportunities [Study]

Most local search professionals will tell you that citations and site relevance to the target geo are the keys to ranking in local search engine results pages (SERPs).

Testing and retesting old methods is part of maintaining SEO strategies so it seemed a smart choice to take a closer look at one of these key onsite factors and conduct a small study on the weight of domain names in rankings. The goal was to evaluate the performance of a related series of keywords in 10 different geographic locations and put them head to head against a term directly associated with the domain name.

For this test we elected to do a study on the University of California school system and produce a small article on the spring break dates for 2012. The domain we chose to test on was Travelfromlosangeles.com, which at the time had 32 total links and had been in existence for about a year. The domain is a typical WordPress blog with beginner basic optimizations and full metadata descriptions and tags.

The specific article page was +1'd and tweeted a couple of times by our team, but over the course of a few months it appeared on the third page of the SERP. The page continued to climb and in February it achieved the top spot for “UCLA Spring Break 2012,” even edging out UCLA.edu.



Surprisingly enough, the page climbed to the optimum position for the key phrase, and we were curious to see how it fared for the other University of California institutions. Upon further review, it was clear that UCLA centered terms garnered a much higher position than those surrounding other schools like Santa Barbara or San Diego.



Utilizing Google Webmaster Tools’ data, we looked at a constant series of terms that only varied in the school location and pulled ranking data for the past 30 days on Google. The data seemed to have a pattern of rank decreasing as distance from Los Angeles increased, so it was compiled it into the graph below. Strangely enough, no data was pulled in by Google WMT on UCSF so that locale was excluded from the graph.

Key Takeaways
UCLA Spring Break 2012 outpaced any other university search term by three spots without receiving the advantage of a mention in the title tag.

The average SERP position for universities has a correlation with the distance they are located from Los Angeles. The trend line shows the furthest institutions as the lowest performing keywords in the SERPs, with the exception of UC Santa Cruz.

Conclusion
While this data is seasonally impacted, it still establishes a clear connection between domain name and ranking opportunity with geo specific keywords. The SEO value of having Los Angeles in the site name is clearly defined by the No. 1 ranking for UCLA Spring Break 2012. When looking to build out a site for a specific geographic region it is advisable to seek out a domain name that references the area in a distinguishable manner to not only the search engine bots but to the searchers as well.

This piece and the research behind it was a collaboration between Michael Martin and his colleague Danny McElroy, SEO specialist, Covario.

Six-Figure Sale at Sedo and Clamor for Country Codes Kept Cash Registers Ringing This Week

Sedo.com claimed the top spot on our all extension Top 20 Domain Sales Chart this week with a nice six-figure sale brokered by one their most consistent producers, Dave Evanson. They chalked up a cool $125,000 for Channel.com. Sedo went on to pile up eight of the 20 chart entries and played a big role in an outstanding week for the ccTLDs.

Seven country code domains earned places on the elite list, led by the $47,000 sale of #2 CheapVacations.ca (Canadian ccTLD) at Frank Schilling's DomainNameSales.com. They notched another one with #13 (tie) VacationPackages.ca at $15,000.

Sedo rang up three of the charted ccTLD sales with #4 Sportbekleidung.de ("sportswear" in German) leading their power trio at $33,000. Brands-and-Jingles was right behind with #5 Instant.ly (Libyan country code) at $32,000. FabulousDomains.com.au added yet another impressive sale to the ccTLD onslaught with #10 MIA.com.au (Australian country code) at $17,400.



By Ron Jackson

Two other five-figure ccTLD sales just missed taking places on the Big Board. In the weeks 21st and 22nd highest reported sales, Sedo sold Hack.me for $10,560 and DomainNameSales moved Longboards.co.uk for $10,500.
DomainNamesSales had a hand in five charted sales including #3 PlatformGames.com at $36,000. Four of the five were from their own listings with the fifth, #17 WebContacting.com at $12,000, being a DomainAdvisors.com domain that was sold on the DomainNameSales platform.

The AfternicDLS also had a big outing with four entries on the leader board, led by #6 OnTime.com at $25,000. They also had the week's biggest non .com gTLD sale (and the only one from that category to make the all extension Top 20) APS.net at $15,000.

The .coms once again took the most chart positions with a dozen, including #7 Others.com, a name that Luc Biggs sold for $23,000 in a private transaction - a very nice return on the $6,250 investment he made when he acquired the domain just a week earlier!

Here's how the sales leaders stacked up for the week ending Sunday, March 18:

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Clements Brothers Launch New Domain Name Auction House and Brokerage Service

wo domain industry veterans who also happen to be brothers, David Clements and Toby Clements, have joined forces to launch a new domain name auction house and brokerage

service called Brannans.com. The name pays tribute to Sam Brannan, a 19th century San Francisco publicist, merchant and publisher whom historians credit with helping to trigger the California Gold Rush that started in 1848.

The name seems appropriate since the Clements brothers have long been part of a modern day gold rush in which domain prospectors pan for valuable pieces of Internet real estate.

David Clements (left) and Toby Clements

One thing that they say sets them apart from the crowd is a focus on selling domain names as brand building tools for business end users. Founder and CEO David Clements said, "End-user marketing and sales is about building relationships with business owners and their key decision makers. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, businesses with less than 500 employees account for 99% of the independent enterprises in the US. When domainers refer to the term end-users, they really mean these businesses and to sell to them you’ve got to build rapport first. Only then can you educate them on the value of using a relatively new asset class for branding and marketing."


Toby Clements said, “I’m very excited to be partnering with my brother David on this new venture. Brannan’s offers additional value and opportunity to domainers and especially to my current newsletter

subscribers at TobyClements.com. It gives me another tool to market domains without getting things too overcomplicated or watered down.”

David added that he and Toby will also work with all of the other auction houses and brokers in the industry to give sellers the maximum possible exposure for their domains. David noted, "Our first priority is to speak to domain investors. If you own or manage a large portfolio and we haven’t met or spoken or emailed in the past two months, please reach out to me at your earliest convenience. I’d love to help you sell some domains at our upcoming first auction and I can also talk to you further about our targeted business brokerage division."

That first auction David referred to is a week-long online event scheduled for April 2, 2012. The deadline for auction submissions is March 28, 2012. You can find submission guidelines as well as a form for submitting your domains here.

Sunday, March 18, 2012

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Investing in Quad llll.com Premium domain guide and tips

Like LLL.coms, it’s important to invest in quality if one wishes to be minimally exposed to future risk. As I’ve said many times before, I’ve long believed the triple premium segment is heavily undervalued (or that single/double premiums are grossly overvalued in comparison if you’d prefer to look at it that way). A quad premium isn’t better than a triple premium because it has more premium letters, rather, it’s better because it usually has a better chance of finding an enduser (that’s the whole premise behind premium letters). When that’s not the case, eg. a no traffic, no acronym, low google frequency, seemingly unbrandable quad premium is imho still considerably overvalued at $210. Why a triple premium with better enduser possibilities (eg. something with 3 strong letters and a U/W) might go for half of that is anyone’s guess — we see this in the LLL.com market as well. I blame it on most domainers not doing enough research before investing and taking the “lazy domainer” approach that quad premium > triple premim, despite the fact that in some cases single premium > quad premium. It’s always important to consider who will buy a domain before investing in it. The only true thing that should separate a quad premium from an LLLL.com available for less is the fact that the quad premium has a better chance of finding an enduser now or in the future — if that’s not the case, you really shouldn’t be paying a 1000% premium over what other LLLL.coms can be had for.

With Quad Premiums, I try to stay away from the letters F,G, and H, which routinely report the lowest sales results. Whenever possible, sticking to LLLL.coms containing 1 (or ideally 2-3) A,E,S, which almost always make for very strong LLLL.coms and letters C, I, L, O add powerful brandability (as do A,E,S once again, of course), especially as ending letters.

Assuming you’re buying near minimum wholesale (eg. under $225 per), I think you’re quite safe and insulated from future risk by staying away from quads containing F,G,H. Of course some quads with those letters are good, but as a general rule they do tend to report lower sales results. Very few domaining segments have as much data readily available to be analyzed as the LLLL.com market — this can be both a blessing and a curse. When it comes to LLLL.coms, statistics is your friend and going with “what sells” really is the only way to go.

Saturday, March 17, 2012

Some Tips to invest in domain names ( top 10 best used)

1. Attempt to Predict the Future

You may not have the genius of renowned futurist Ray Kurzweil who has been hired by Bill Gates on numerous occasions just to talk, but you can still predict the future of the domain industry. By the time a child born today graduates from college, Kurzweil believes that poverty, disease, and reliance on fossil fuels will be a thing of the past. Ray bases his predictions on the exponential growth in the power of technology, or as he calls it–the Law of Accelerating Returns. We can apply futuristic predictions to valuable domain name investments. Think outside of the box; education & technology, information syndication, social networking, robotics, alternative energy…you get the picture.

2. Stick With the “Dot Com”

This suggestion could be argued, but generally successful investors and domaining old schoolers will tell you that they will put their money on “.com” remaining at the top of the food chain for quite awhile. If you get in the market early for a popular ccTLD (country code top level domain) like .us, .tv, etc.; you may be able to snag a great name. The risk factor for “.com” is significantly less than the other extensions. Maybe we should ask Kurzweil what he thinks.

3. Keep it Short and Sweet

In the world of domains, generally speaking; 2 letter names are a fool’s dream; 3 letter names are king; 4 letter non-sense names are an easy sale; 5 letter names bank a small fortune. You would, however, be hard pressed to find any of those to add to your portfolio. My best suggestion to you is not to stray past two words within a domain name. Memorability, ease of typing and visual aesthetics play a big part in a domain’s value.

4. Keep it Brandable

Make sure the words you choose in your domain flow well together; repeat your name aloud several times to see how it sounds spoken. Ask your friends and family what their first impression of your name choices are. Does your name relate well to the industry or audience the website would be targeting?

5. Keep it Real

We have all seen them, invented names or characters mashed together that form pronounceable syllables–Yahoo, Google, Twitter, Tumblr. While many popular websites today have done well with these odd brand names it would be hard to market a cheaper version of these names to anyone, which brings me to my next point…

6. Have a Buyer in Mind

Before investing your money into a domain name, ask yourself a few questions about your future buyer. Would anyone want to buy this domain name today? What niche industry or population could I market this name to? Is this domain relevant to a small business industry, a single person or a large movement? The more potential buyers the better.

7. Don’t Spend More than Current Value

Do your homework. Research aftermarket domain sales portals such as Sedo, TDNAM, Afternic as well as domain forums for current sales prices of similar names. You can get a good idea of the value of your domain and some insight into how its value may mature in the future. I suppose there can be some exceptions to this tip if you’re Mr. Moneybags and find a name you are just sure is going to be a hit.

8. Don’t Sell Until it’s Ripe

Imagine you’re at the 1923 World Series and Babe Ruth tosses your baseball back to ya with his name jotted down in fresh black ink. A friend of a friend of your second cousin offers you $50 bucks for the ball a week later… you simply don’t sell your green bananas! The amount of people logging on to the internet and developing their own websites increases tremendously each year. If you think you’ve got a keeper, do just that.

9. Develop Relevant Content

Search Engines today are a key element to driving traffic to our names and essentially allow certain websites to be discovered. There are vast amounts of information and domain names that are essentially hidden to the world simply because webmasters do not take the steps to publish and promote quality information. If nothing else, setup a WordPress blog script on your domain name, get some quality web hosting and regularly publish relevant content to your domains.

10. Nurture Your Name

Incoming unique visitors, Google’s PageRank, backlinks and web reputability can add significant value to any domain. While publishing current events and related content to your domain name, manually submit your site to quality web directories. Social networks such as MyBlogLog, StumbleUpon and Bumpzee can also add reputation and send visitors to your name.

LLLL.com Price Guide

LLLL.com Price Guide
New Price Guide coming soon at:

LLLL.com Price Guide is a guide to domain investors , we gathered this information from our experience.

Time until Expiration/Renewal (subtract $0.60 from the values reported below for every month less than 1 full year remaining on the registration).

Numbers in parentheses reflect maximum likely obtainable prices in a reseller environment for domains fitting a particular letter pattern. Sales near the maximum suggested prices are generally for quad premium examples which are pronounceable, memorable, and acronym-friendly. Rare LLLL.coms are treated separately later in the price guide. All prices quoted are reflective only of what one could expect to pay in a reseller environment — suggested maximum prices have no meaning if you’re targetting endusers or selling generic 4 letter .coms.

LLLL.com Price Guide s wholesale / double / triple premium .coms

LLL.com:
Min Wholesale: $5800
Double Premium: $6600
Triple Premium: $10000
LLLL.com:
Minimum Wholesale: $22
CCCC: $22 ($500)
CCVC: $25 ($600)
CVCC: $27 ($600)
CCVV: $30 ($600)
VCCC: $30 ($750)
VVCC: $32 ($1000)
VCCV: $34 ($1500)
CVVC: $45 ($1800)
VVVC: $75 ($1000)
VCVC: $75 ($4000)
CVVV: $85 ($900)
VVCV: $80 ($1500)
VCVV: $100 ($2000)
VVVV: $250* ($1500)
CVCV: $300 ($9000)
* Insufficient sales data to conclusively provide a minimum valuation.
The letter Y was considered a consonant for the purpose of this price guide. In reality, it can serve as both a consonant or vowel, however this often becomes somewhat subjective and open to bias (eg. sellers will always think their domain is more pronounceable than buyers).
single premium: $22
double premium: $26
triple premium: $35
quad premium: $210
triple letter: $200 ($800)
triple repeat: $350 ($1800)
palindrome: $300 ($1200)
ABAB: $275 ($1000)
AABB: $400 ($1500)
Quad Premium rares (triples, palindromes, ABAB, AABB) generally sell for 1.5 to 2.5 times quoted minimum wholesales.
Triple Premium Breakdown
Prices in parentheses reflect maximum likely prices in a reseller environment for cookie cutter examples (as defined above) which lack significant distinguishing features (such as much pronounceability). Prices to the left reflect the minimum wholesale prices per type of triple premium LLLL.com.
Q/X: $35 ($60)
Z: $40 ($80)
Y: $45 ($90)
J: $50 ($100)
V: $65 ($100)
K: $60 ($120)
U: $75 ($130)
W: $80 ($150)
Pronounceable Performance Breakdown
When dealing with pronounceable 4 letter .coms, the question often arises whether the letter “Y” takes on the properties of a consonant or those of a vowel. When dealing with CVCVs, a “Y” found in the 4th position is often considered to take on the properties of a vowel and when found in the 2nd position, the role of a consonant.
Recent sales data follows which should help better elucidate the difference between valuations of CVCY/CYCV, as well as demonstrate the differences in value between a CVCV containing no “Y” and one containing a “Y”.
CVCV:
cuji.com $854 07/16/2008 SnapNames
keqa.com $500 07/16/2008 BQB
Lodo.com $17000 07/16/2008 RickLatona.com
nize.com $1664 07/16/2008 Sedo
cegu.com $1109 07/14/2008 Sedo
hene.com $1900 07/14/2008 Sedo
kiqe.com $407 07/11/2008 Sedo
zuso.com $1250 07/11/2008 Sedo
gofu.com $1450 07/10/2008 Sedo
kiqe.com $407 07/10/2008 Sedo
pafe.com $1806 07/10/2008 Sedo
buli.com $2200 07/09/2008
hopa.com $15000 07/09/2008 Afternic
mafa.com $3000 07/09/2008 Sedo
sule.com $2291 07/09/2008 Sedo
tezi.com $1355 07/08/2008 Sedo
vuqu.com $360 07/05/2008 Sedo
piwu.com $1001 07/04/2008 Sedo
vudi.com $664 07/04/2008 Sedo
jisu.com $3988 07/02/2008 Sedo
CYCV:
dypa.com $490 07/17/2008 Sedo
hypi.com $3000 07/16/2008 Afternic
gyqa.com $110 06/20/2008 Sedo
CVCY:
kedy.com $1360 07/17/2008 Sedo
lesy.com $1027 07/09/2008 Sedo
moky.com $1600 07/09/2008 BQB
raxy.com $353 07/07/2008 Sedo
cavy.com $3134 07/04/2008 Sedo
noqy.com $191 07/03/2008 TDNAM
posy.com $2,202 06/27/2008 Sedo
cufy.com $510 06/21/2008 Sedo
rizy.com $675 06/20/2008 Sedo
CVYV:
goyo.com $3970 ($9000) 07/02/2008 Sedo, resold on 07/14/2008 at TDNAM
woya.com $4500 07/02/2008 Afternic
mayu.com $2001 07/01/2008 Sedo
YVCV:
Yeco.com $1022 07/09/2008 NameJet
yuzu.com $3800 07/08/2008 NameJet
yuki.com $8850 07/07/2008 NameJet
VCVC:
icav.com $506 07/14/2008 NameJet
iduf.com $130 07/09/2008 Private
avos.com $3093 07/06/2008 NameJet
ases.com $4100 07/02/2008 Sedo
ocal.com $2550 07/02/2008 Sedo
upax.com $4418 07/02/2008 Afternic
igax.com $176 06/30/2008 NameJet
ocal.com $2550 06/27/2008 Sedo
avof.com $243 06/26/2008 Sedo
upaj.com $3000 06/25/2008 Afternic
ases.com $4100 06/24/2008 Sedo
ocal.com $2550 06/22/2008 Sedo
inoq.com $177 06/21/2008 Sedo
aqit.com $140 06/20/2008 NameJet
uzuf.com $105 06/20/2008 NamePros Auction
aced.com $12500 06/19/2008 Afternic
ataw.com $310 06/19/2008 NameJet
umuj.com $150 06/18/2008 Private Sale
erar.com $970 06/16/2008 NameJet
axah.com $145 06/14/2008 BQB.com
VCVC (containing Y):
oyom.com $175 07/09/2008 TDNAM
ufyl.com $29 07/04/2008 DigitalPoint
eyah.com $1061 07/03/2008 SnapNames
ywew.com $31 06/12/2008 SnapNames
ahyn.com $162 06/11/2008 Sedo
ymel.com $252 06/07/2008 TDNAM
obye.com $211 06/06/2008 SnapNames
OSYT.com $160 06/06/2008 NamePros
yqiq.com $42 06/03/2008 TDNAM
unyf.com $71 06/02/2008 NameJet
yruf.com $47.99 06/02/2008 eBay
VCCV:
afcy.com $95 07/17/2008 Sedo
erdy.com $75 07/16/2008 Afternic
ilqo.com $80 07/15/2008 TDNAM
ufgo.com $133 07/15/2008 TDNAM
ufgo.com $133 07/14/2008 TDNAM
uyri.com $51 07/14/2008 TDNAM
ipyi.com $82 07/09/2008 Pool
ozmo.com $25,000 07/09/2008 Sedo
opli.com $360 07/05/2008 NameJet
ihpy.com $52 07/04/2008 TDNAM
udqu.com $25 07/04/2008 NamePros
ugzi.com $29 07/04/2008 TDNAM
uxzy.com $29 07/04/2008 DigitalPoint
uhqu.com $25 07/03/2008 NamePros
ilfa.com $560 06/25/2008 Sedo
umno.com $2,500 06/25/2008 Ebay
ezsa.com $250 06/24/2008 NameJet
ahza.com $121 06/20/2008 NameJet
eqgi.com $51 06/18/2008 TDNAM
VCCV (containing Y):
afcy.com $95 07/17/2008 Sedo
erdy.com $75 07/16/2008 Afternic
uyri.com $51 07/14/2008 TDNAM
ipyi.com $82 07/09/2008 Pool
ihpy.com $52 07/04/2008 TDNAM
uxzy.com $29 07/04/2008 DigitalPoint
ujly.com $180 06/18/2008 Sedo
ijgy.com $53 06/16/2008 TDNAM
ihqy.com $28 06/12/2008 SnapNames
ikfy.com $110 06/12/2008 SnapNames
YMNY.com $200 06/12/2008 NamePros
ytda.com $60 06/12/2008 SnapNames
iyki.com $90 06/11/2008 SnapNames
ynca.com $2736 06/06/2008 NameJet
ingy.com $691 06/02/2008 NameJet
ilgy.com $100 06/01/2008 NameJet

buy expired domains with traffic and monetize it

Recently i was looking at some godaddy expiring domain auctions. What interested me was the domains with traffic, so i thought i will invest some money buying them and use one of the turn key websites i bought on ebay a http://bit.ly/FOWHPS nd make money with google adsense from the traffic its getting everyday.

My website is www.netjobsdirect.com

The trick worked, i bought a domain which was getting 1k visitors , and i was able to make atleast $10-$15 per day .. Not bad uhh ..

I will share more info on its progress

Friday, March 16, 2012

Blockbuster .Net Sale One of Two 6-Figure Deals That Top This Week's Domain Sales Chart

A blockbuster .net sale - the year's biggest non .com gTLD sale reported to date - claimed the top spot on this week's all extension Top 20 Domain Sales Chart. Frank Schilling's DomainNameSales.com did the honors with CDN.net at an astounding $185,000 - more than triple the amount paid for the previous 2012 leader in this category (DIY.org at $60,000).

The runner up position went to another six-figure 3-letter domain - SOL.com, sold at Sedo.com for $127,400. We learned about yet another three-letter .com purchased by Danish businessman Marcus Kocak for $150,000 in a private transaction, however that one was made under a non-disclosure agreement. In addition, DomainNameSales had another six-figure .com sale this week that they could not release due to an NDA.

That left the #3 position open for the week's biggest ccTLD sale, Online-Casinos.de at €65,000 ($84,500) via Sedo. Just last week Sedo sold the un-hyphenated version of that domain for the same price.



By Ron Jackson

Sedo went on to sweep 15 of the 23 chart entries (the extra positions resulted from a four-way tie for the final spot). Their roster included three of the four non .com gTLDs on the elite list, including #9 (tie) Surgeon.org at $19,000. They also rang up all three country code sales on the Big Board with #11 TalkFusion.de ($18,850) and #12 Life.me ($17,450) Joining Online-Casinos.de in the ccTLD camp.

DomainNameSales also had another solid week with five charted sales including three of the first six. Their group included #4 Deng.com at $65,000 and #6 PrivatKredit.com at $35,000.

That left just three openings and the AfternicDLS took every one of those with a power trio led by #8 GetMoneyFast.com at $19,850.

Forbes publication : Owning a domain name is forever if it has “Google juice”

A really interesting article was just published by Forbes entitled “Owning a domain name is forever if it has “Google juice”

The article talks about the dangers of re-branding from an existing domain name to another domain and letting the old domain drop.

“”Planning to revamp your branding? Maybe relaunch your company or product line?Then before you say “we’ll just point the old domain name to our new domain and let the old one expire” consider the following tale”

I’ll let you read the entire article but here is “The moral of the story”

” If you decide to refocus your marketing and branding and switch to a new new domain name when you’ve had an online presence that has worked to any degree then never, ever let the old domain name go … you’ll have to plan to own it forever.”

Investing in .us domains good or bad ?

Someone asked me the other day what the highest .US domain sale was. I honestly had no idea so I started my search in the DNJournal archives and on NameBio and DNSalePrice. I wasn’t expecting a lot but I was a little surprised when I saw how few .US domain sales reported even break the $25k mark. I understand .COM is the TLD that people in our country recognize and use but .US is still the official ccTLD of the United States.
The .US TLD is the most underperforming ccTLD in existence, I’ve felt this way for a long time. When you look at ccTLD’s like .DE, .EU, .CO.UK, .FR, .CA and even .PL, .NL, .SE and .CC their top sale, sales volume and average sales price all dwarf .US sales stats. Below are the list of documented .US sales above $15,000 (prices rounded to nearest thousand) all the way back to 2004.
Video.us $75k (2007)
Taxi.us $35k
Job.us $35k
SexToy.us $51k
Jew.us $29k
Jews.us $25k
Famo.us $25k
Baseball.us $25k
Voip.us $25k
Foods.us $20k
Football.us $19k
Video.us $18.5k (2008)
Computer.us $17k
Bingo.us $15k
Miami.us $15k
You’ll notice that Video.us is on this list twice. And according to DNJournal this is accurate – the top selling documented .US domain was resold a year later for a seventy five percent loss! Ouch.
I can’t remember all the .US domain names I have but I am pretty sure if I rounded them all up it would be enough to count on one hand. I also can’t remember making a significant sale of a .US domain name. Does this mean I think ALL .US names are worthless? No. I think it means that the best ones are undervalued and also that besides true premium .US names, other investments in the space are not worthwhile.
I do expect that with the rise of gTLD’s, .US will gain some more traction. .US could also really use some help from its parent company Neustar which has done next to nothing to help promote the .US brand over the last few years.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Tuesday Big Old List of Domains At Auction, Dropping, or For Sale Around the Net 3-13-12

One of the down sides of having a brick and mortar business is you have to come in contact with people. Hundreds of them. Any one of them could be a petri dish of disease. Shaking hands, talking close. Add in an all weekend trade show and I didn’t stand a chance. Throw in 37 miles running and I’m as good as dead. And that’s how I felt yesterday. I apologize to all those that I told off or made cry yesterday when I was in my bad mood. Now on to today’s names.

Paymachine.com Good mobile wallet name. 7 years old. Also my title around the house.

Hoarded.com Could pretty much sell anything you want. I almost didn’t even want to share this name as I have nightmares for 3 days after every show of hoarders.

SurfingKites.com Not a huge sport but growing in popularity every year. I think Woody Harrelson kite surfs and if he does it, it’s cool. Lots of ads but valuate.com doesn’t like it

VintageCoupons.com I’m pretty sure they’re all going to be expired

1stFamily.com I like firstfamily better but still worth a few hundred and more if built out. 15 years old and that alone gives it some value.

Snuffed.com Dictionary word with no bidders……until now

FlooringOptions.com Great name for a flooring company and there are already many companies that share that same thought. Values at $1000

BikerLady.com Cool but not sexy. I picture saggy boobs, tats, and leather, like in leather skin.

PetLane.com I heard they are adding new lanes on all California streets for people that drive with their dogs in their laps. It allows everyone else to get the hell away from those crazies.

GeoTarget.com I would think a bunch of people in our industry would like this name.

DealJump.com Very common, easy to spell words and contains the word deal. Good brand.

Saturday, March 10, 2012

Four letter llll .com investment guide

Reece of Four Letter Noob released his 4 letter dot com price guide today. This is the mid-March update which as always goes into plenty of detail and statistical analysis. It shows what everyone has predicted, a staggering increase in LLLL.com values!


The minimum wholesale price of 4 letter domains has increase 114% over the last month. Excellent news for any 4 letter domain investor and not just for the single reason that ‘our’ stock has increased in value but because if 4 letter domains increase enough over regfee there will be no reason for anyone to drop them. Buy bargain llll.com domains from ebay.With a decrease in drops and supply and an increase in demand and end users (as many predict), prices will continue to rise.

I see ebay listing many llll.com domains. I was interested in one particular seller 1Domainaday.com his ebay seller id 1DomainADay , i have bought many domains from him, he always sells quality domains.

My eyes are on RDoy.com ,waiting for auction listings.

I think this week I will evaluate my portfolio based on Reece’s price guide and report the increase in my portfolios value… that will make an interesting article I’m sure!

After visiting a few domain forums doing a little research on some domains. I was baffled by the fact that there was a few threads tracking the value of "lll.com" and "llll.com." To my amazement I couldn't imagine why anyone would want to own four l's for a domain. Since it doesn't actually describe what the website is about. Then I thought about the human nature aspect of owning a domain name with four letters or numbers. Since, not many people will actually be able to own that kind of domain name! Of course, that adds to the value that four letter domain names, but since the internet is constantly growing. Even becoming more popular every year and has even more time to grow I think the value is reaffirmed.

The internet is massive and is constantly growing with the introduction of blogs that allow people to interact. Since, technology also keeps expanding into more powerful languages like Ajax, PhP, and Java continued expansion is a logical assumption. Not only that, hosting and storage prices have come down a lot since 2000. Making it much more cost effective to host your own website. Which again adds to the value of domain names, since it's adding demand for the need of domains. In my opinion as long as storage becomes cheaper, technology makes websites file sizes more compressed, then demand will continually rise for domain names. Including the domains that are four letters with no apparent value other than there demand.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3588531

Future is in Social networking domains

A survey shows that in 2011 over 47% of American adults used a social network.

"Social networking sites are hugely popular because they bring people together and they can interact with each other and find users with similar interests. Users can share ideas, activities, events, photos. Users can contribute content which can be broadcasted and uploaded so selected friends can view them. Social networks connect people at low cost and make it easier to keep in touch with others around the world" said Paul Wilson, domain name expert.

Social networks can also be based on shared business needs or experiences. Social Interaction is very rewarding for everyone because common interests can be shared internationally. Companies can use social networks to create brand awareness, to recruit, as an online reputation management tool, to learn about new technologies and competitors, and as a lead generation tool to find potential clients.

"The future of publishing is on the Internet and SocialMagazine.com is the perfect domain name for an online magazine covering the social world or as a social site itself. The social activity is online so it makes sense to cover it with an online magazine. Social users are international and the proper extension to cover this huge international market is the dot com."

Five Top Domain Investment Strategies

Five Top Domain Investment Strategies – Part 1 of 5
There are essentially five domain investment strategies that work better than most others. This is not information most people would be willing to share, but I thought I’d let it out there – if it helps one person register better domains, all the better.
Investment Strategy # 1: Geo Domains
City names, state names, country names in any tld are called Geo domains. Such names might be tough to monetize without development, but resale values are usually substantial and most extensions will get traffic and thus revenues. Generally locations with population greater than 100,000 are considered worthy of owning, but high value niche locations can be just as lucrative.
These domains are tough to hand register, but you can pick up drops here and there and when new TLDs are introduced these are the first to get sold out, specially if its a ccTLD or a TLD that matches the geo location.
I’ll give a few examples of core geo domains – NewYork.com, NewDelhi.com or even Mumbai.in would be core geo domains.
Second rung geo domains are of the type CityState.tld or CityCountry.tld or even CityStateabbreviation.tld – such domains are best restricted to the top 3 gtlds – .com / .net / .org or their local ccTLDs; Examples of such names would be MumbaiIndia.com or MumbaiMH.com;
Valuations of such domains are tough to ascertain and thus extreme care should be taken to ensure that you do not overpay for such domains as traffic is usually extremely restricted to these.
The third rung of Geo domains are what are known as Keyword Geo domains.These only make sense for extremely high population areas like Capital cities and Major Metros. Again, these are best in .com / .net / .org or geo matching tlds.
A lot of these are still available and in some locations end users love them as it allows them to get to the top of the SEO heap pretty easily. I’ve seen quite a few end user and bulk sales of these type of domains to brick and mortar companies or professionals who get the whole PPC game.
Examples of Geo Keyword domains are AttorneySeattle.com or DoctorsLondon.com or CarDealerNewYork.com or MumbaiMart.com and ChaloIndia.com – which are the first domains I ever registered back in 1998. They are still developed sites though due for a makeover soon.
Even developed, these are tough to monetize, though the amount of local goodwill one can gather from these is tremendous and this creates a good amount of leads for other related service offerings.
I will say here that my Geo Domain holdings are extremely minute and only represent less than 1% of my domain portfolio and are only limited to my own Geo location and sphere of work.

LLLL.com Price Guide what domains to invest

LLLL.com Price Guide


Time until Expiration/Renewal (subtract $0.60 from the values reported below for every month less than 1 full year remaining on the registration).

Numbers in parentheses reflect maximum likely obtainable prices in a reseller environment for domains fitting a particular letter pattern. Sales near the maximum suggested prices are generally for quad premium examples which are pronounceable, memorable, and acronym-friendly. Rare LLLL.coms are treated separately later in the price guide. All prices quoted are reflective only of what one could expect to pay in a reseller environment — suggested maximum prices have no meaning if you’re targetting endusers or selling generic 4 letter .coms.
LLL.com:
Min Wholesale: $5800
Double Premium: $6600
Triple Premium: $10000
LLLL.com:
Minimum Wholesale: $22
CCCC: $22 ($500)
CCVC: $25 ($600)
CVCC: $27 ($600)
CCVV: $30 ($600)
VCCC: $30 ($750)
VVCC: $32 ($1000)
VCCV: $34 ($1500)
CVVC: $45 ($1800)
VVVC: $75 ($1000)
VCVC: $75 ($4000)
CVVV: $85 ($900)
VVCV: $80 ($1500)
VCVV: $100 ($2000)
VVVV: $250* ($1500)
CVCV: $300 ($9000)
* Insufficient sales data to conclusively provide a minimum valuation.
The letter Y was considered a consonant for the purpose of this price guide. In reality, it can serve as both a consonant or vowel, however this often becomes somewhat subjective and open to bias (eg. sellers will always think their domain is more pronounceable than buyers).
single premium: $22
double premium: $26
triple premium: $35
quad premium: $210
triple letter: $200 ($800)
triple repeat: $350 ($1800)
palindrome: $300 ($1200)
ABAB: $275 ($1000)
AABB: $400 ($1500)
Quad Premium rares (triples, palindromes, ABAB, AABB) generally sell for 1.5 to 2.5 times quoted minimum wholesales.
Triple Premium Breakdown
Prices in parentheses reflect maximum likely prices in a reseller environment for cookie cutter examples (as defined above) which lack significant distinguishing features (such as much pronounceability). Prices to the left reflect the minimum wholesale prices per type of triple premium LLLL.com.
Q/X: $35 ($60)
Z: $40 ($80)
Y: $45 ($90)
J: $50 ($100)
V: $65 ($100)
K: $60 ($120)
U: $75 ($130)
W: $80 ($150)
Pronounceable Performance Breakdown
When dealing with pronounceable 4 letter .coms, the question often arises whether the letter “Y” takes on the properties of a consonant or those of a vowel. When dealing with CVCVs, a “Y” found in the 4th position is often considered to take on the properties of a vowel and when found in the 2nd position, the role of a consonant.
Recent sales data follows which should help better elucidate the difference between valuations of CVCY/CYCV, as well as demonstrate the differences in value between a CVCV containing no “Y” and one containing a “Y”.
CVCV:
cuji.com $854 07/16/2008 SnapNames
keqa.com $500 07/16/2008 BQB
Lodo.com $17000 07/16/2008
Rdoy.com $1550 08/12/2008 Private sale
RickLatona.com
nize.com $1664 07/16/2008 Sedo
cegu.com $1109 07/14/2008 Sedo
hene.com $1900 07/14/2008 Sedo
kiqe.com $407 07/11/2008 Sedo
zuso.com $1250 07/11/2008 Sedo
gofu.com $1450 07/10/2008 Sedo
kiqe.com $407 07/10/2008 Sedo
pafe.com $1806 07/10/2008 Sedo
buli.com $2200 07/09/2008
hopa.com $15000 07/09/2008 Afternic
mafa.com $3000 07/09/2008 Sedo
sule.com $2291 07/09/2008 Sedo
tezi.com $1355 07/08/2008 Sedo
vuqu.com $360 07/05/2008 Sedo
piwu.com $1001 07/04/2008 Sedo
vudi.com $664 07/04/2008 Sedo
jisu.com $3988 07/02/2008 Sedo
CYCV:
dypa.com $490 07/17/2008 Sedo
hypi.com $3000 07/16/2008 Afternic
gyqa.com $110 06/20/2008 Sedo
CVCY:
kedy.com $1360 07/17/2008 Sedo
lesy.com $1027 07/09/2008 Sedo
moky.com $1600 07/09/2008 BQB
raxy.com $353 07/07/2008 Sedo
cavy.com $3134 07/04/2008 Sedo
noqy.com $191 07/03/2008 TDNAM
posy.com $2,202 06/27/2008 Sedo
cufy.com $510 06/21/2008 Sedo
rizy.com $675 06/20/2008 Sedo
CVYV:
goyo.com $3970 ($9000) 07/02/2008 Sedo, resold on 07/14/2008 at TDNAM
woya.com $4500 07/02/2008 Afternic
mayu.com $2001 07/01/2008 Sedo
YVCV:
Yeco.com $1022 07/09/2008 NameJet
yuzu.com $3800 07/08/2008 NameJet
yuki.com $8850 07/07/2008 NameJet
VCVC:
icav.com $506 07/14/2008 NameJet
iduf.com $130 07/09/2008 Private
avos.com $3093 07/06/2008 NameJet
ases.com $4100 07/02/2008 Sedo
ocal.com $2550 07/02/2008 Sedo
upax.com $4418 07/02/2008 Afternic
igax.com $176 06/30/2008 NameJet
ocal.com $2550 06/27/2008 Sedo
avof.com $243 06/26/2008 Sedo
upaj.com $3000 06/25/2008 Afternic
ases.com $4100 06/24/2008 Sedo
ocal.com $2550 06/22/2008 Sedo
inoq.com $177 06/21/2008 Sedo
aqit.com $140 06/20/2008 NameJet
uzuf.com $105 06/20/2008 NamePros Auction
aced.com $12500 06/19/2008 Afternic
ataw.com $310 06/19/2008 NameJet
umuj.com $150 06/18/2008 Private Sale
erar.com $970 06/16/2008 NameJet
axah.com $145 06/14/2008 BQB.com
VCVC (containing Y):
oyom.com $175 07/09/2008 TDNAM
ufyl.com $29 07/04/2008 DigitalPoint
eyah.com $1061 07/03/2008 SnapNames
ywew.com $31 06/12/2008 SnapNames
ahyn.com $162 06/11/2008 Sedo
ymel.com $252 06/07/2008 TDNAM
obye.com $211 06/06/2008 SnapNames
OSYT.com $160 06/06/2008 NamePros
yqiq.com $42 06/03/2008 TDNAM
unyf.com $71 06/02/2008 NameJet
yruf.com $47.99 06/02/2008 eBay
VCCV:
afcy.com $95 07/17/2008 Sedo
erdy.com $75 07/16/2008 Afternic
ilqo.com $80 07/15/2008 TDNAM
ufgo.com $133 07/15/2008 TDNAM
ufgo.com $133 07/14/2008 TDNAM
uyri.com $51 07/14/2008 TDNAM
ipyi.com $82 07/09/2008 Pool
ozmo.com $25,000 07/09/2008 Sedo
opli.com $360 07/05/2008 NameJet
ihpy.com $52 07/04/2008 TDNAM
udqu.com $25 07/04/2008 NamePros
ugzi.com $29 07/04/2008 TDNAM
uxzy.com $29 07/04/2008 DigitalPoint
uhqu.com $25 07/03/2008 NamePros
ilfa.com $560 06/25/2008 Sedo
umno.com $2,500 06/25/2008 Ebay
ezsa.com $250 06/24/2008 NameJet
ahza.com $121 06/20/2008 NameJet
eqgi.com $51 06/18/2008 TDNAM
VCCV (containing Y):
afcy.com $95 07/17/2008 Sedo
erdy.com $75 07/16/2008 Afternic
uyri.com $51 07/14/2008 TDNAM
ipyi.com $82 07/09/2008 Pool
ihpy.com $52 07/04/2008 TDNAM
uxzy.com $29 07/04/2008 DigitalPoint
ujly.com $180 06/18/2008 Sedo
ijgy.com $53 06/16/2008 TDNAM
ihqy.com $28 06/12/2008 SnapNames
ikfy.com $110 06/12/2008 SnapNames
YMNY.com $200 06/12/2008 NamePros
ytda.com $60 06/12/2008 SnapNames
iyki.com $90 06/11/2008 SnapNames
ynca.com $2736 06/06/2008 NameJet
ingy.com $691 06/02/2008 NameJet
ilgy.com $100 06/01/2008 NameJet
CVVC:
coaf.com $850 07/17/2008 NameJet
faim.com $2214 07/17/2008 SnapNames
raom.com $510 07/12/2008 Sedo
hoyd.com $333 07/11/2008 NameJet
HeyB.com $251 07/10/2008 Sedo
hiin.com $1,550 07/10/2008 Sedo
ceux.com $1,657 07/09/2008 Sedo
nuyq.com $24 07/07/2008 NamePros
luyh.com $75 07/04/2008 TDNAM
yeod.com $100 07/04/2008 BQB
fioc.com $511 07/02/2008 NameJet
xiys.com $42 07/02/2008 TDNAM
zyir.com $42 07/02/2008 TDNAM
coag.com $710 07/01/2008 Sedo
tuez.com $206 07/01/2008 SnapNames
duup.com $419 06/30/2008 TDNAM
duup.com $414 06/30/2008 TDNAM
soih.com $365 06/30/2008 Sedo
wyyv.com $22 06/30/2008 BQB
fuor.com $10,000 06/29/2008 Afternic
CVVC (containing Y):
hoyd.com $333 07/11/2008 NameJet
HeyB.com $251 07/10/2008 Sedo
nuyq.com $24 07/07/2008 NamePros
luyh.com $75 07/04/2008 TDNAM
yeod.com $100 07/04/2008 BQB
xiys.com $42 07/02/2008 TDNAM
zyir.com $42 07/02/2008 TDNAM
wyyv.com $22 06/30/2008 BQB
noyz.com $785 06/21/2008 NameJet
jyet.com $101 06/18/2008 SnapNames
zyig.com $60 06/18/2008 TDNAM
koyq.com $50 06/09/2008 TDNAM
nyyq.com $94 06/09/2008 TDNAM
muys.com $398 06/08/2008 NameJet
piyq.com $39 06/08/2008 TDNAM
JYOF.com $30 06/07/2008 NamePros
tiyj.com $39 06/07/2008 TDNAM
xyir.com $50 06/06/2008 TDNAM
deyq.com $57 06/02/2008 TDNAM
As a general rule, 2 Y’s in the same CVCV is something you’d like to try and stya away from if possible. As can be seen above, Y’s often result in very strong sales, regardless of their consonant/vowel status in CVCV type LLLL.coms, however it’s best to stick with a CVCY pattern for maximum enduser and reseller potential. If offered 2 comparable CVCV, the one without a “Y” is usually a better choice.
These same basic principals can be applied to other pronounceable categories. The “Radio Test” really is the best way to get a good idea of whether your LLLL.com is pronounceable or not. If your LLLL.com was mentioned on the radio, would listeners be able to spell it without difficulty? It’s better to ask other people than to try and determine this yourself — most of us will be inherently biased towards our own LLLL.coms.
In general, the best performing letters are: A, S, E, M, D, I, T, O. Other strong letters include F, G, H. The letters J,K,Q,U,V,W,X,Y,Z are referred as non-premium letters. The presence of one of these letters considerably devalues a 4 letter .com under most circumstances. Of these, Q, X, Z are the weakest.
Certain letters perform better in certain positions than others. The letter “I” for instance is a particularly strong ending letter which stands as an acronym for many commonly used words such as International, Incorporated, Industries,… C,I,L make stronger ending letters than they typically are elsewhere in an LLLL.com. A and O are strong in either the starting or ending position and S is stronger in the starting position. This is by no means an exhaustive list, merely examples of letters which perform better in particular positions.
Always Consider:
Pronounceability (does it pass the radio test?)
Memorability
Brandability
Likelihood of an existing or future enduser
Traffic/Revenue
Anything which differentiates it from other LLLL.coms

Definitions:
C = Character. When seen in a domain name listing, the number of C’s refers to the number of characters in a domain name. In the domain name industry, the term Character refers to either a Letter of the
English alphabet (A-Z) or a Number (0-9). A domain with many characters may have both many letters and many numbers.
L = Letter. When seen is a domain name listing, the number of L’s refers to the number of letters in a domain name.
N = Number. When seen in a domain name listing, the number of N’s refers to the number of numbers in a domain name.
Premium LLLL.com: A premium domain name is a domain name composed exclusively of letters: A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,L,M,N,O,P,R,S,T. These letters are referred to as “premium letters”. A premium LLLL.com is, in other words, an LLLL.com devoid of the letters: J,K,Q,U,V,W,X,Y,Z. These letters are commonly referred to as non-premium letters. The letters J,K,U,V,W,Y are considered by most domain investors to be of higher quality than the letters Q,X,Z. The letters: J,K,U,V,W,Y are commonly referred to as “semi-premium” letters, whereas Q,X,Z are referred to as “bad letters”. These terms are used strictly in a reseller setting and currently hold the largest weight in the 3 and 4 letter markets. More information on premium letters and premium domains will be provided in the 4 letter (LLLL) .com section which is included below.
As a general rule, Characters can be represented by Letters or Numbers. A 3 letter .com (LLL.com) is also considered a 3 Character .com (CCC.com). Likewise, a 2 number .com (NN.com) is also considered a 2 Character .com. Because LLL.coms and NNN.coms are so popular, we list them separately on BQB in their own categories visible on the BQB homepage. The following are industry terms used on BQB and an explanation of their meaning.
2 Characters
LL = 2 Letter .com. Two Letters from A-Z. They may be the same letter or different letters. Examples include: AA.com, BC.com, DJ.com, MX.com, YQ.com.
LN = Letter-Number .com. One Letter from A-Z followed by One Number from 0-9. Examples include: A1.com, B9.com, X2.com, Y5.com.
NL = Number-Letter .com. One Number from 0-9 followed by One Letter from A-Z. Examples include: 1A.com, 9B.com, 2X.com, 5Y.com. Notice the difference in letter-number placement between an LN.com and an NL.com.
NN = 2 Number .com. Two Numbers from 0-9. They may be the same or different numbers. Examples include 11.com, 21.com, 47.com, 90.com.
3 Characters
LLL = 3 Letter .com. Contains 3 Letters from A-Z. Examples include: AAB.com, ABC.com, JHD.com, OOO.com.
LLN = Letter-Letter-Number .com. Two Letters from A-Z followed by One Number from 0-9. Examples include: JH7.com, KL4.com, MM8.com, ZX2.com.
LNL = Letter-Number-Letter .com. One Letter from A-Z followed by One Number from 0-9, which is followed by One Letter from A-Z. Examples include: B2B.com, G4S.com, B3G.com, Y2K.com.
LNN =Letter-Number-Number .com. One Letter from A-Z followed by Two Numbers from 0-9. Examples include: C93.com, D22.com, B16.com, W40.com.
NLL =Number-Letter-Letter .com. One Number from 0-9 followed by Two Letters from A-Z. Examples include: 4DD.com, 3NT.com, 7WJ.com, 9QS.com.
NLN = Number-Letter-Number .com. One Number from 0-9 followed by One Letter from A-Z, which is followed by One Number from 0-9. Examples include: 2D4.com, 5Y7.com, 6R1.com, 3F2.com.
NNL = Number-Number-Letter .com. Two Numbers from 0-9 followed by One Letter from A-Z. Examples include: 40A.com 66V.com, 75J.com, 91R.com.
NNN = 3 Number .com. Contains 3 Numbers from 0-9. Examples include: 123.com, 300.com, 444.com, 747.com. 4 Characters
LLLL = 4 Letter .com. Contains 4 Letters from A-Z. Below we define different types of 4 Letter .coms.
Anti-Premium: A domain name that contains only non-premium letters. An anti-premium domain is a domain which is composed strictly of letters: J,K,Q,U,V,W,X,Y,Z. The term Anti-Premium is most commonly applied to 4 Letter .coms, however it also makes a good adjective to describe the 3 letter crap selling near min wholesale as well. Examples of Anti-Premium LLL.coms include: YXZ.com, VKQ.com, XZW.com, QKU.com. Examples of Anti-Premium LLLL.coms include: WKQU.com, XYQZ.com, YQUW.com, KQJV.com.
Anti-Premium LLLL.coms are the lowest quality LLLL.coms on the market and are generally among the cheapest.
Single Premium: We use this term to refer LLLL.coms containing only one premium letter. Examples of Single Premium LLLL.coms include: JHXZ.com, UQTX.com, WQUE.com, EUWJ.com.
Double Premium: We use this term to refer to LLLL.coms containing two premium letters. Examples of Double Premium LLLL.coms include: ASWQ.com, BJKT.com, WVMG.com, HWRZ.com.
Triple Premium: We use this term to refer to LLLL.coms containing three premium letters. Examples of Triple Premium LLLL.coms include: ASDX.com, POSW.com, NWOO.com, XEEB.com. LLL.coms containing three premium letters are commonly referred to as “Premium LLL.coms”. Examples include: SAS.com, RTN.com, NPG.com, RSS.com.
Quad Premium: We use this term to refer to LLLL.coms containing four premium letters. Examples of Quad Premium LLLL.coms include: AAAL.com, FFLE.com, MNGO.com, GHPR.com.
Pronounceables
CVCV = A 4 letter .com domain name which follows a Consonant-Vowel-Consonant-Vowel letter pattern. CVCVs are generally extremely pronounceable and are among the most valuable LLLL.coms. Examples include: MELO.com, MOFO.com, ZENE.com, LUMI.com. Many CVCVs are actual words in English or in another language and that partly contributes to their high valuations, on top of their immense brandability and obvious enduser potential.
CVVC = A 4 letter .com domain name which follows a Consonant-Vowel-Vowel-Consonant letter pattern. Examples include: NOOL.com, ROOX.com, BEER.com, MOOT.com.
VCCV = A 4 letter .com domain name which follows a Vowel-Consonant-Consonant-Vowel letter pattern. Examples include: ADDA.com, ELLO.com, INGE.com, UGFO.com
VCVC = A 4 letter .com domain name which follows a Vowel-Consonant-Vowel-Consonant letter pattern. VCVCs are often among the most pronounceable and desirable LLLL.coms, right up there with CVCVs. Examples include: OPAL.com, ONEX.com, ILEC.com, UQEN.com.
Rares
AABB = A 4 letter .com domain name which contains only 2 different letters, where “A” and “B” symbolically represent two different letters from A-Z. Examples include: CCDD.com, DDJJ.com, MMXX.com, ZZGG.com.
ABAB = A 4 letter .com domain name which contains only 2 different letters, where “A” and “B” symbolically represent two different letters from A-Z. Examples include: CDCD.com, DJDJ.com, MXMX.com, ZGZG.com.
Palindromes = A 4 letter .com domain name which contains only 2 different letters from A-Z. Examples include: CDDC.com, DJJD.com, MXXM.com, ZGGZ.com. Palindromes are commonly referred to ABBA-type LLLL.coms.
Triple Letter = An LLLL.com containing three of the same letter. These are sometimes referred to as Triple letter repeats in the case it is of an AAAB or BAAA letter pattern. Examples include: SSSJ.com, SWWW.com, HHGH.com, IJII.com. Notice how each of these examples showcases the Triple Letter LLLL.com differently. These are all considered Triple Letter LLLL.coms.
VVVV = A 4 letter .com domain name which contains four vowels. Examples include: AEIO.com, EUOU.com, IOUI.com, EAUU.com.
5L.coms
CVCCV = A 5 letter .com domain name which follows a Consonant-Vowel-Consonant-Consonant-Vowel letter pattern. CVCCVs are among the most popular 5L.com domain names which are registered and resold today. Examples include: RORRE.com, FOGGE.com, ZINNE.com, VISTA.com.
CVCVC = A 5 letter .com domain name which follows a Consonant-Vowel-Consonant-Vowel-Consonant letter pattern. CVCVCs are essentially CVCVs with an additional consonant at the end. Examples include: FALES.com, FIRAL.com, SAGEP.com, LINUX.com.
CVCVV = A 5 letter .com domain name which follows a Consonant-Vowel-Consonant-Vowel-Vowel letter pattern. CVCVVs are essentially CVCVs with an additional vowel at the end. Examples include: RAGOO.com, PARIA.com, MELOO.com, MONEE.com.
CVVCV = A 5 letter .com domain name which follows a Consonant-Vowel-Vowel-Consonant-Vowel letter pattern. CVVCVs are CVCVs with an additional vowel included before the second consonant. Examples: ZOOME.com, ROOMI.com, PIECO.com, MOOLA.com.
VCVCV = A 5 letter .com domain name which follows a Vowel-Consonant-Vowel-Consonant-Vowel letter pattern. VCVCVs are essential VCVCs with an additional vowel at the end. Examples include: ATOMO.com, EFOTO.com, ISAMI.com, OSIRA.com.
Due to the high prices CVCVs and VCVCs have been seeing lately, many 5L.com investors see CVCCV, CVCVC, CVCVV, CVVCV, and VCVCV as five of the most promising 5L.com alternatives to brandable LLLL.coms which are rapidly increasing in price.

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